Event Information

Bingham-Waggoner Mansion & Estate Investigation
with Riverside Iowa Paranormal


Ticket sales will end on Mar. 27, at 10:00 PM local time.

Returns Policy:

All sales are final (No returns)


Exchange / Upgrade Policy:

Exchange / upgrade accepted within the same event (no money back) Click here to go to the event

Exchange / upgrade accepted up to 2 hours before the event.

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The estate was first plotted in 1827 with the current home being built in 1852 alongside the Santa Fe Trail.
 
George Caleb Bingham was the first owner of the home. George was a famous politician and Civil War artist. He and his family moved to the estate shortly before the outbreak of the Civil War. George maintained a studio at his residence in Independence, a log-and-clapboard building to the northwest of his home. It was in this studio his famous painting Order Number 11 was painted.
 
During this period, Bingham also was politically active. In 1868, he became a candidate for Congress from the Sixth Missouri District. He was defeated at the nominating convention.
 
In 1870, George sold the home to Mr. Francis Eames so that he could move to Kansas City.
 
The Waggoners were early millers in Perry and Cumberland Counties, Pennsylvania. In 1865, Peter Waggoner, Sr. sent his son William to Independence to look over business opportunities. William liked the prospects, and in 1867 the family purchased the “old City mill” from John Overfelt. The family business developed a reputation for producing the very best in baking and cake flours, and “Queen of the Pantry” flours became known all over the middle west.
 
Reflecting their improved economic condition, the Waggoner’s new home across the street from their rapidly growing flour mill immediately began to be adjusted to fit the needs and expectations of its owners. During the 1890’s, extensive renovations were done to the home when William Henry, Jr. and his wife moved into the home.
 
The Waggoner family continued to live in this home until 1976, when Harry K. Waggoner died. In 1979, a group of private citizens, in cooperation with the City of Independence, purchased the 19.5 acre tract for a museum and public park.
 
Join us and you might experience:
The Ghost Bride—a bride tripped on her gown and fell town the stairs to her death. 
 A bench in the sitting room was created by a prisoner at MSP
 Female yelling
 Male coughing and yelling
 Basement—shadows.
 
 
All Tickets Sales are final. Due to this, consider purchasing the "Event Cancellation Policy" offered at check-out. Please review its policies and restriction before purchasing.
 
Ghost hunting should be handled with maturity, respect, and seriousness. Zero Tolerance for alcohol/drug consumption right prior, during or after the event; Not Liable for injury before, during or after the event. Under 18? Please ask the Event manager before purchasing. 
 
Events are subject to change, as a result of uncontrollable circumstances. This includes location, talent and time/date. When this occurs you will be given an opportunity to keep the updated ticket (including new date/time). If this is an inconvenient change, you will be given full credit for another one of our events (specific to the event managers, not of all Thriller Events).
Absolutely no refunds will be applied.
 
By purchasing ticket(s) to this event, it confirms you have read, understand and accept these conditions and rules. 
 
Thank you for your engagement!